Foggy Bay > Ketchikan > Meyers Chuck > Anita Bay > Deception Point Cove > Petersburg

 

It's been a while since we posted, but that is not for lack of trying! Internet is hard to come by up here, so I am posting from my phone and unfortunately can't upload many photos- I'll have to update this lost when we get to Juneau in a couple days!

Well, so far we have not been disappointed by Alaska! Once we left Prince Rupert, our last stop in Canada, we spent the night in Foggy Bay- a bay where US customs allows boats to anchor if they can’t make the trek to Ketchikan all in one day. On Saturday we made it to Ketchikan just in time for the 4th of July and picked up my dad, who flew in from Salt Lake to sail with us for the next two weeks! 

 

 Flying over the Misty Fiords National Monument

Flying over the Misty Fiords National Monument

 View of Ketchikan

View of Ketchikan

Ketchikan is a fun little touristy town. It was definitely a change of pace for us. Cruise ships line the channel and there is a constant flux of people. We had been debating whether we had time to go to the Misty Fiords National Monument, and ultimately we decided we couldn’t afford the extra 3 days in our schedule. Lucky, on Sunday we woke up to clear skies and warm weather and my dad decided to book us a scenic float plane ride through the monument! It was such an incredible experience. We rode in a Beaver and I got to sit co-pilot. They took us through the mountains and then we landed in an alpine lake for a little break before we headed back. The terrain was dramatic and the alpine lakes and green mountains were so beautiful! 

 Sunset from Meyers Chuck anchorage

Sunset from Meyers Chuck anchorage

After the flight we took off around noon and made it to an anchorage in a village called Meyer’s Chuck, where we finally got to see a proper sunset. The next day was unusually warm and sunny. At 8pm, last night it was still about 75 degrees! We anchored in a beautiful inlet called Anita Bay and then continued up to the small fishing town of Wrangell yesterday. The channel that lead to Wrangell is a popular commercial fishing area, which we quickly learned. We had to dodge all kinds of fishing boats with nets out.

 Kevin sews our ripped sail

Kevin sews our ripped sail

 Hammocking in Anita Bay on a 75 degree evening!  

Hammocking in Anita Bay on a 75 degree evening!  

 Petersburg North Marina surrounded by fish processing plants

Petersburg North Marina surrounded by fish processing plants

After stocking up on ice and some groceries in Wrangell, we continued on to anchor at the southern end of the Wrangell Narrows. The Wrangell Narrows is the most direct passage from Wrangell to Petersburg. It receives all kinds of traffic from small cruise ships, ferries, barges, fishing boats and, of course, the occasional sailboat. Because it has a strong current, we wanted to time it right with the tides, so we took off at 5:40 yesterday morning and made our way through the maze of green and red markers all the way up to Petersburg. We arrived here nice and early and had all day to spend wandering around and getting to know the town. We went for a long walk to a beach called Sandy Beach which looks out to the north. We have been so lucky with the warm weather, but finally got a taste of what Alaskan weather is really like- drizzly! Today we are headed out in search of whales and glaciers as we make our way up toward Juneau!

 
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